Don McCormick, a native of Houston, often wondered what place his faith had in his life, and furthermore, how he could use it to help those less fortunate. His life of service began in 1959 when he served in the U.S. Army as a Radar Technician. In 1967, he graduated from the University of St. Thomas and received an undergraduate degree in History, and continued to complete courses in Advanced Studies in Property and Casualty Insurance at the University of Houston.

McCormick continued to work in virtually every sector of the insurance industry, including life, health, and auto. Upon completing an HMO Management Course at Mills College sponsored by Wharton School of Finance in 1977 and Computer Systems, Languages, and Operations classes, McCormick went on to become president of Computechnology Corporation, a software firm that installed, customized, and maintained IDOL-BAS accounting systems and Medical Practice Management Systems that operated on Basic Four Computers. It was during this time that he performed the initial development work for the establishment of a national Preferred Provider Organization (PPO). From 1987 to 1996, he served as executive director of National Association of Preferred Providers, an association of individual physicians, hospitals, Independent Practice Associations (IPAs) and Primary Health Care Organizations (PHOs) who contract with insurers and employer trusts to provide health care services in managed care plans.

McCormick’s faith, as well as his extensive experience and service within the insurance and health care industries, led him to the conclusion that the current health care system in America does not adequately meet the needs of the uninsured and underinsured. Further, he speculated that it does not meet the needs of anyone since it leaves those who can afford it at great financial risk due to extraordinarily high costs. Subsequently, in 1996, McCormick became the director of Tomorrow’s Bread Today (TBT), a faith-based group of men and women whose goal is to help the poor and do works of mercy, including making efforts to extend health care to all who need it. He presently manages contracting between physician groups and care organizations, using the income to obtain health care for the poor.

TBT believes the problems with healthcare exist equally on the local and national level. While much attention at this time is focused on addressing local needs, the organization under McCormick’s leadership hopes to demonstrate that better models for health care exist than those currently in place. TBT believes that it is possible to structure physician groups in such a way that they can deliver efficient care without the influence of large insurance or other administrative organizations. The money saved in effective administration can be used to meet the needs of those in the community who do not have the means to pay for health care.

Don McCormick believes that solutions come from actions based on the virtues of love, peace, truth, tolerance, and cooperation. These virtues have been included in the incorporated name of Tomorrow’s Bread Today. For McCormick, “It is a reminder of who we must be and what we must do today to reach our goals for tomorrow.”